Ligotti in the WFR

Some reading suggestions from Thomas Ligotti, including this temptation:

The weirdest stories I’ve ever read composed the collection Hollow Faces, Merciless Moons (1977) by William Scott Home. The prose is so complex and recondite that it’s all but unreadable, much like that of Clark Ashton Smith. Furthermore, Home’s narratives are baffling and sometime barely comprehensible, somewhat in the manner of Robert Aickman. For a while I thought that Home was either an inexpert writer or a mental case.

(More Ligotti at the WFR here. Plus a story.)

Doors to Ligotti

A brief introductory guide:

Ligotti’s collections can be extremely difficult to find as many are out-of-print and no longer available. […] However, the folks at Penguin have finally seen the light, and will be releasing an omnibus edition of Ligotti’s Grimscribe and Songs of a Dead Dreamer collections this October.

So, to celebrate the upcoming release of this monumental horror volume, I’ve compiled a list of some of the best Ligotti stories out there with the intention of helping new readers familiarize themselves with one of the greatest writers in horror history. …

Underlinings (#24)

Pynchon in Cow Country?

Hmm. Somewhere I have heard of an author as reclusive as J.D. Salinger (who has no further need to defend his privacy). No, not the Italian Elena Ferrante (also a pseudonymous invention), but an American. Rather than face what he (assuming the gender itself is not fictional) calls “a false and destructive system” that is nonetheless “a reality of our world,” Pearson notes that his response is to “manufacture disposable authorial personae for every book,” making each one earn its own way rather than piggybacking on whatever reputation a previous title may have earned its author. … […] … The great Portuguese poet and novelist Fernando Pessoa created what he called heteronyms, alter egos or personas that allowed him to write as “them” instead of himself, a liberating and fruitful creative approach, he found. It is possible that something akin to that is going on here, if the same sensibility is behind both names, and that freeing oneself and one’s book from the connotation-heavy name seemed a good idea. However, Pessoa’s heteronyms are characters in his fiction — they express themselves and feel and act as personas — and that is not the case with Pearson, who, except outside the novel as his reality is created online, is merely a name affixed to Cow Country. So far.

Underlinings (#10)

German Sierra on ‘Deep Media Fiction’ (preliminary draft):

If the ghost used to be the subject of action, it is now the machine who becomes responsible for animating the ghost. The consequence of this action-reversal is that what works mechanically — or organically — can only be examined, modelled or modified in accordance to the (recurrent) reloading of humanist discourses …

(Much interesting Ccru deployment within.)