The Torist

The Dark Web now has its ‘own’ literary journal.

Anonymity is a breeding ground, be that for debate, creativity, or exploration. So where better to publish a socially-conscious, digitally focused literary journal (.onion link) than on a Tor hidden service … [?]

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Mutant Media

Migration of the novel:

[Dennis] Cooper’s work promises to totally recontextualize the ground behind it, thereby revising the way we think.

That innovation is particularly evident in his latest release, Zac’s Haunted House, a free digital novel composed entirely of animated GIFs. The novel appropriates an experience somewhere between carnival mirror labyrinth, deleted Disney snuff film, and a deep web comic strip by Satan, building out the idea that a book doesn’t have to simply be sentences on paper, or even terribly concerned with language at all.

Smarm Singularity

Its contour already visible:

Lately Facebook is getting a little too intimate with me. “Good morning, Leigh,” it coos. “Thanks for being here. We hope you enjoy Facebook today.” Then, like a slice of dystopian cafeteria lunch, it serves one of its abysmal “memories” into my feed, some forgotten years-old share, and when I tell it I don’t want to see that, Facebook scrapes apologetically: “We know we don’t always get it right.” […] No, Facebook, of course you don’t. Remember how you started serving me wedding ads when I’d only just told one or two people I was engaged? That was creepy. Facebook is absolutely, indisputably creepy, a fungal colony of privacy violations fused helplessly to our human infrastructure. It spies on its employees and it demands pictures of our ID so it can regulate our names. […] Everybody knows Facebook is creepy. Nonetheless, all this time it never occurred to me to delete my account until it began doing this: Trying to act like a person. Pretending we are on a first-name basis. […] We often imagine the inevitable future tech dystopia will be cold, populations marching under the eye of sterile robot overlords, our speech monitored and scrubbed of sentiment and intonation. Increasingly, though, it seems like we’re hurtling toward the opposite: A singularity of smarm, where performative — maybe even excessive — intimacy is the order of the day. […] Of course we don’t want creeper spy colony Facebook to be our friend. But creating the impression of intimacy is becoming increasingly crucial to the content economy today, and it’s happening everywhere. …

(Coldness be my God.)

Spontaneous Divination

Searching for “a method by which to scry using the Internet as a whole …”

The Library of Babel … uses a small set of characters, lower case letters, no digits, and the only punctuation marks are comma and period. here is how i use it. i type in my search string, which for the purpose of demonstration will be my entire post. next i look at the results page and examine the options. the third option down shows where your string is found, padded with random english words. choose more random word matches and then scroll down the list of matches until one finds a number which is appealing. click that number. see the search string in bold. look at the words to either side. ta da.

The Library of Babel (link).

(Other than it being a ‘data’ anagram, I’m not getting much from “ta da”.)

Now Online

Via Rhizome:

Conceived by Lars Holdhus and commissioned by Rhizome, Futures Along the Blockchain is a web project gathering artists, musicians, and writers to annotate a case study which explores the history of Bitcoin while speculating on the utility of its underlying blockchain technology for both art and music distribution.

Much of interest at the site, including video of a Tibetan Bitcoin mining facility.

ADDED: Commentary at AoT.

Urbanomic Documents

The first one, here, is a Meillassoux, Hecker, Mackay conversation at the edge of cognitive possibility contingency.

The series is introduced: “These Documents aim to expose exploratory, informal processes of transdisciplinary research and development, through working papers, sketches and conversations relating to projects in progress.”

(I’m going to grab the opportunity to ask: Does Urbanomic have the worst-organized site on the Internet? If this document hadn’t been waved at me on twitter, there is simply no way on earth I’d ever have found it.)