Underlinings (#29)

Watts:

There’s a range, in other words. You don’t need anywhere near a complete brain to function in modern society (in fact, there are many obvious cases in which having a complete brain seems to be an actual disadvantage). And in a basic survival sense, the ability to write and appreciate the music of Jethro Tull and do other “civilised” things aren’t really that important anyway. […] So now I’m thinking, tewwowist virus: something engineered to take out higher brain functions while leaving the primitive stuff intact. Something that eats away at your cognitive faculties and lets your inner reptile off the leash, something that strips your topheavy mind down to its essentials, something that speeds your reflexes and cranks your vision even as it takes the light from your eyes. […] I’m thinking zombies. …

(The lead in is just as ‘good’.)

(Via.)

Tri-Net

Back in January, Al Fin found this gem:

A growing body of research has identified the presence of multiple brain networks supporting human behavior. These networks include a salience network involving dorsal anterior cingulate and anterior insula regions thought to be relevant to attending to survival-relevant events in the environment; a central executive network (CEN) consisting of regions in the middle and inferior prefrontal and parietal cortices engaged by many higher level cognitive tasks and thought to be involved in adaptive cognitive control; and a default mode network (DMN) consisting of regions in medial frontal cortex and posterior cingulate, among others, that reliably reduce their activity during active cognitive demands and which may be involved in attention to internal emotional states or self-referential processing.

His gloss:

The model of 3 interacting brain networks — the Default Mode Network (mind wandering), the Salience Network (taking note of change or something of possible import), and the Central Executive Network (on-task focusing of attention) …

Meandering, (opportunistic) attention, and (focused) application — the three neural modes of temporalization.