Hail Amazon (#3)

In the NYT:

The company’s winners dream up innovations that they roll out to a quarter-billion customers and accrue small fortunes in soaring stock. Losers leave or are fired in annual cullings of the staff — “purposeful Darwinism,” one former Amazon human resources director said.

Vice comments:

Matt Yglesias argues at Vox that Amazon’s work culture is so relentless because it’s a “startup that never grew up,” but Silicon Valley is exporting that startup culture to companies desperate for modernization, everywhere. So 24/7 digital communications, big data, and a veneer of world-changingness — the implements of torture for Amazon employees — are increasingly commonplace. Amazon, in other words, is not some dystopian outlier. It’s the new normal. It’s just a little more frank about its goals and intentions.

Touchy-feely PR statements are no doubt on the way.

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Tri-Net

Back in January, Al Fin found this gem:

A growing body of research has identified the presence of multiple brain networks supporting human behavior. These networks include a salience network involving dorsal anterior cingulate and anterior insula regions thought to be relevant to attending to survival-relevant events in the environment; a central executive network (CEN) consisting of regions in the middle and inferior prefrontal and parietal cortices engaged by many higher level cognitive tasks and thought to be involved in adaptive cognitive control; and a default mode network (DMN) consisting of regions in medial frontal cortex and posterior cingulate, among others, that reliably reduce their activity during active cognitive demands and which may be involved in attention to internal emotional states or self-referential processing.

His gloss:

The model of 3 interacting brain networks — the Default Mode Network (mind wandering), the Salience Network (taking note of change or something of possible import), and the Central Executive Network (on-task focusing of attention) …

Meandering, (opportunistic) attention, and (focused) application — the three neural modes of temporalization.